Benji is not only one of the best albums of the year so far; it might be the best album Mark Kozelek has ever released. But in Benji, Mark Kozelek, the weary-voiced troubador and bearer of bad news, released an album chock full of personal facts about his concerns for his mother’s health, his sex life, and his midlife crisis. His set at Pitchfork was so laden with vocal reverb (sounding like an off-key Jim James) that you truly could not hear anything he was saying. It was almost as if Kozelek was too embarrassed to reveal anything anymore, so he hid behind three walls of sound and instead told some uncomfortable racial jokes (he joked about how white his crowd was before singling out the lone black person in the crowd and declaring himself “comfortable with black people”). When Kozelek finally exited his chair (his band members remained seated), he delivered “By the Time That I Awoke” standing up and awkwardly pacing back and forth, all with the stage presence of a first-spelling-bee middle schooler. One of the most anticipated sets of the festival was a total bust.


Sun Kil Moon is named the Most Disappointing Set of Pitchfork Music Festival 2014 by Frontier Psychiatrist. Photo by Matt Meschede. Read more superlatives and festival coverage here.

“You can’t just go to Google, and say ‘I want to listen to good music,’” Kaskie explains. “What the fuck does that even mean?” Essentially, that’s the goal of Pitchfork: to be a resource to today’s listeners. Obviously, the manner in which that goal manifests itself across Pitchfork’s many sub-brands has changed, and will continue to change. That said, the constant focus, according to Kaskie, is to provide great content to the publication’s growing audience. “In the end, we’re indebted to our audience. What they care about is the only thing that matters,” he says. “There’s a responsibility there that we always need to maintain.”

Peter Lillis interviews Chris Kaskie, President of Pitchfork Media, and analyzes their considerable influence and potential concessions due to their growing size. We’ll be at Pitchfork Music Fest this weekend, stay tuned here, to our Twitter, and to our staff members for on the ground coverage.

"Working for a small shop like ours, it’s easy to envy Pitchfork Media. With an expanded staff, accommodating resources and a revenue flow, Pitchfork churns out review after review, feature after feature, announcement after announcement, and so on. The FP skeleton crew busts their ass to bring you daily essays, recipes, photo journals, lists and of course, reviews, all (we hope) with the signature FP seal of quality. This isn’t to say their editors and writers don’t work hard or that they don’t employ quality standards, it’s just that the economies of scale are clearly in their favor. What is more difficult is to give credit where credit is due."
Peter Lillis reviews Pitchfork Music Fest, with photos courtesy of filmmaker Mark Meatto.
  • Camera: Canon EOS REBEL T3i
  • Aperture: f/5.6
  • Exposure: 1/640th
  • Focal Length: 76mm

"Working for a small shop like ours, it’s easy to envy Pitchfork Media. With an expanded staff, accommodating resources and a revenue flow, Pitchfork churns out review after review, feature after feature, announcement after announcement, and so on. The FP skeleton crew busts their ass to bring you daily essays, recipes, photo journals, lists and of course, reviews, all (we hope) with the signature FP seal of quality. This isn’t to say their editors and writers don’t work hard or that they don’t employ quality standards, it’s just that the economies of scale are clearly in their favor. What is more difficult is to give credit where credit is due."

Peter Lillis reviews Pitchfork Music Fest, with photos courtesy of filmmaker Mark Meatto.

I’ve been working on some design stuff, some architecture stuff, some coffee stuff. I want to be better at cooking. I want to learn how to make an automatic watch— you know, like little watches that have lots of moving springs, I’d love to know more about how they’re made and see if I can make one, just one. I’m trying to learn as much as I can about things I don’t know anything about for the next few years.

James Murphy speaks on his life post-LCD Soundsystem. (He’s been in the studio with Yeah Yeah Yeahs, too.)

This sounds a lot like I imagined what James Murphy’s life to be even while LCD Soundsystem was still active.

(Source: pitchfork)