White Lung @ Subterranean, Chicago
September 10, 2014

Jeez, was this worth being out late on a Wednesday night. Starting with two aggressively heavy openers – the second of whom featured a bassist who inexplicably took off all his clothes except bikini cut black undies and Doc Martens – the night was just a steady stream of solid punk rage. Of course, lead singer Mish Way owned the stage, twirling around in a leopard-print open kimono, throwing her bleached-dry blonde hair over her eyes, channeling Stevie Nicks, Courtney Love and her own inner demons all at once. For many of us in the audience, though, the show was stolen by this epic feud between one bro in a handkerchief fashioned as headband who decided that the front was to be a mosh pit and this really really big burly guy in a faux-Velvet Underground tee who did not agree with the bro and therefore tried to throw him to the ground, or at least as far away from the front as possible every time that handkerchiefed douche came in contact with him, which was actually probably more often than accident would allow. Set this rivalry to a soundtrack of White Lung playing perfectly and I’m really upset my iPhone died before I could film the whole thing / put on YouTube / cause a sensation // Kati Heng

brendatheband:

Apple King

alex, leah, johnee dub and dave made noises at full glass, silver spring
tommy sherrod found the noises & combined them
thom delair met an apple man and drew him

Great new single from DC’s BRNDA, out today. Reminds me of the good days of They Might Be Giants and B-52s with smooth indie rock production. Catch them tomorrow night at Comet Ping Pong with Paperhaus and The Sea Life.

Pile - “Special Snowflakes”

The latest single from Boston post-emo four piece is an epic in the true sense of the word, not as a synonym for ‘good’ as the internet keeps insisting. Instead, “Special Snowflakes” is a wide-open yet calculated work of art that encapsulates the cyclical nature of the human condition; the singular seven-minute dark punk equivalent of Infinite Jest. Hyperbole, yes; like DFW was never guilty of letting rational analysis get in the way of a good story.

Through this song, Pile have erected a world-sized magnifying glass that targets the brain as if it was an ant. This will leave a mark. //Peter Lillis

While you’re at it, spin their full length Dripping, out now on Exploding In Sound.

It’s been a minute since we updated this. If only we had a device to tell us how long it’s been. Updates coming soon.

Dmitry Samarov - Where To? A Hack Memoir
Dmitry Samarov is a Moscow-born artist living in Chicago. He received a degree at the Art Institute of Chicago and like so many of us art-school graduates, turned to the service industry for steady employment. For over twenty years, first in Boston then Chicago, Samarov drove a cab; he retired in 2012. With a clear mind and a sharp eye, he first wrote about his experience in Hack: Stories From a Chicago Cab in 2011. He recently released Where To? A Hack Memoir which I was more than happy to donate to on Kickstarter. Naturally, there’s no shortage of stories working long hours in a job that caters to the wide range of humanity found in the bizarre, the drunk, and (occasionally) the generous customer. Accompanied by the author’s sketches of people and places, Where To? is an enjoyable read of stories related to both his good and bad “fares” as well as how much of a pain in the ass it is to own and operate a cab in Chicago, legally and logistically. The book is necessarily Chicago-centric but the fast pace can keep any reader engaged. Samarov is reading at various places around the city and country in the coming months. Highly recommended. //Andrew Herzberg
  • Camera: iPhone 4
  • Aperture: f/2.8
  • Exposure: 1/15th
  • Focal Length: 3mm

Dmitry Samarov - Where To? A Hack Memoir


Dmitry Samarov is a Moscow-born artist living in Chicago. He received a degree at the Art Institute of Chicago and like so many of us art-school graduates, turned to the service industry for steady employment. For over twenty years, first in Boston then Chicago, Samarov drove a cab; he retired in 2012. With a clear mind and a sharp eye, he first wrote about his experience in Hack: Stories From a Chicago Cab in 2011. He recently released Where To? A Hack Memoir which I was more than happy to donate to on Kickstarter. Naturally, there’s no shortage of stories working long hours in a job that caters to the wide range of humanity found in the bizarre, the drunk, and (occasionally) the generous customer. Accompanied by the author’s sketches of people and places, Where To? is an enjoyable read of stories related to both his good and bad “fares” as well as how much of a pain in the ass it is to own and operate a cab in Chicago, legally and logistically. The book is necessarily Chicago-centric but the fast pace can keep any reader engaged. Samarov is reading at various places around the city and country in the coming months. Highly recommended. //Andrew Herzberg